Forum Replies Created

Viewing 6 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #25608
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      All issues have been uploaded and the collection is now complete (the article above has been updated as well). Many thanks Theresa!

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
    • #22500
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      No, they won’t. The problem there is that Facebook doesn’t allow other websites to extract posts from groups, only public pages can be used (and #hashtags not at all). Thus the public pages of several peony societies and peony nurseries are placed together on this site on the homepage under their own section, which gives a clear overview I think. But those societies that use ‘groups’ instead of pages (for example: the Swedish Peony Society) are not available. That also encompasses very popular groups like planet peony (that want to reach as many people as possible), and smaller more specialized peony species groups (that probably want to keep their discussions to themselves anyway).

      It works however on Instagram (and Twitter), be it a business account or a personal account. All one has to do is use the hashtag #thepeonysociety when posting a peony image and when our server looks for updates on instagram it will collect the posts with it, after which they will appear here. Currently they will simply appear under the ‘peonies on social media’ section on the homepage. If peony season is amongst us, or if people start posting some peony images they already have, I can easily create another section on the homepage where they will automatically appear then, maybe I should already do that. Most posts in the section ‘peonies on social media’ are moderated for different reasons and are somewhat delayed until I can look at them, but posts with that hashtag #thepeonysociety are added automatically without moderation.

      If you want to post your images in the group planet peony, you could also first post them on Instagram (with #thepeonysociety added) and then simply share them on facebook planet peony, which is what we also did with our trial image post on Instagram. Instagram was created to share images, so it works well this way. If you do it that way, they can be viewed on Instagram, Facebook and here.

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
    • #22272
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      Thank you. About the images in the cultivar database, there are only a few ones present now which I took myself mostly. It’s possible for site visitors to upload images along with the comments about the cultivars. The cultivar database does have room for improvement (there are only just over 1,100 varieties in it, it could use multiple image uploads, more image formats, better search options and so on), but for now I’m lacking the technical prowess to be able to change it much further and I personally don’t consider it a priority as there are two other large peony databases on the web available that in fact offer the possibility to be merged into one super-database (but a marriage takes two…)

      Taking images that correspond exactly to the specification of the cultivar registration is very difficult. Mainly for two reasons.

      1. Many white peony flowers change color during blooming time, usually from some pink shade towards white. That is also the case for many other colors as well (just take at look at the video of Coral Sunset changing color). When it’s sunny and hot this tends to happen faster, or when it’s cold the pink may appear much darker and last longer. So the flower on any single day may look completely different, you would need a picture of the flower nearly every day.
      2. The light/sun conditions can make the flower color look completely different. It’s very difficult to make a good image of a peony, most of all a white one, when there’s a lot of sun. You would need a clear but still slightly cloudy day without any direct sunlight to take a good picture.

      The American Peony Society has its own database of peonies, 4,000-5,000 of them with currently over a 1,000 varieties with an image added to them. http://americanpeonysociety.org/cultivar-registration/peony-cultivars All registered cultivars are there and a few older ones that were added without registration long ago. What is missing are more recent cultivars that have not been registered (many European ones) and most Chinese/Japanese cultivars. You can easily search the database by date, cultivar name, breeder and so on.

      Carsten Burkhardt’s website http://www.paeon.de also has a database of peonies, with far more varieties, including those that were never registered. It also includes many descriptions from books and other websites, sometimes even in other languages. Next to that there are lots of images, not to mention the other very interesting sections of the website (breeders, the works of AP Saunders, a literature overview with many links and so on). It would be the perfect informative peony site but, alas, it hasn’t been updated in almost a decade and I don’t expect this to change anymore. The fact that it hasn’t received any updates is one of the main reasons I’ve created this site http://www.peonysociety.eu . There would be no challenging Carsten’s website when it comes to the amount of information present, but everything becomes outdated when nothing new is added. I’ve tried to contact him a few times to merge his site into this one, but I’ve never been able to reach him. Perhaps I should try again.

      Thank you for your comments.

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
    • #21847
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      Lest we forget, here are some pictures I’ve taken from the roots now that they have been dug. The first picture shows both the comparison between a plant that has been mowed down after flowering (right) and one that was left to grow (left). The one mowed down still had green foliage and stems of course. Then the next three images, the first one is from the ‘normal’ Canary Brilliants, and the remaining two from the rebloomer. I couldn’t see any difference between the number of eyes (buds), the only real difference is that the ones on the mowed down one are much smaller. That would seem obvious as many of the secondary buds from the Spring growing season were ‘activated’ into growing during Summer and even some new buds on the Spring flowering stems (you can see that if you look good at the images (click them to enlarge)). New buds were developed amongst those new stems, but they didn’t have as much time to develop into large buds as yet. Still, they are there and I’m sure they will grow fine.

      I should add that the rebloomers had many stems without flowers. Thus the average 5 flowers per plant in the article means that I did have some 5 flowering stems and perhaps another 7 not flowering, thus say some 12 stems in total. The remark that during a normal season (without those unusually hot days we experienced this year) more flowers would be attainable is based upon the fact that several of the not flowering stems showed a dried up bud and I attribute that to the extremely fast growing. It is well known from research (in Israel) that very high temperatures during growth can result in some aborted flower buds. Of course, some stems without a flower is not too bad as you need stems with foliage on to have new buds developing. Alternatively it would be wise, when cutting during Summer, to leave part of the stem with foliage on, something which is not too difficult as Canary Brilliants has tall stems that at times reach 120 cm (4 feet).

      IMG_1356

      IMG_1357

      IMG_1358

      IMG_1359

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      1+
    • #20457
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      Henry Chotkowski has mailed me the following images of White Vanguard, the ‘better’ one #79H14-1.

      First image shows the bush habit with free standing blooms and foliage to the ground; Photo 2 is a freshly opened bloom; and Photo 3 is a bloom a couple of days older.

      IMG_8575

      IMG_8566

      IMG_9761

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
    • #18957
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      Old Faithful is somewhat the exception to the rule here. It seems the petals can take water standing in the bud/open flower for a very, very long time before becoming infected with botrytis. I’ve never had any problems with flowers from them, notwithstanding the fact that the bud has a ‘rose-bud’ which is exposed to rain, cold and wind for a very long time. So it’s indeed not necessarily that kiss of death. But other varieties are not that resistant. I’ve given up on Moonrise as a cutflower because of these open buds, I got too many complaints from florists that the flowers opened with rotten stamens. I could leave the stems with open buds on the plants of course, not all stems do have an ugly bud, but the proportion of open buds in this cultivar has always been very high the years that I have been growing it. Too bad, as it does have many qualities, floriferous, early, large flower, large buds, yellow color, very sturdy stems. Although there’s also a second reason for not growing it anymore: it smells awkward, and I mean really, really awkward (less of a problem when growing it outside, but as a cutflower…).

      You have noticed in some of your seedlings that they didn’t show those open buds when young, but at a more mature stage, they somehow appeared. Here the problem occurs one year more than the other. I’m not sure it has to do with the plants being more mature, the one location where Vanilla Schnapps showed the open buds, happened to be newly replanted divisions, whilst the locations with no ‘damage’ were older plants (2 years old and 3 years old). Therefore I would think temperature is more an issue. And also the fact that the sidebuds on these same young plants had perfectly closed buds, would make me think it’s the cold that somehow causes this. These sidebuds have developed somewhat later and they may thus have been in another less sensitive stage when the cold (wind?) damaged the further developed main buds. I’ll add an image of another variety Great Northern, which grew here for the first time, it also had an open main bud, but you can also see the sidebud perfectly formed. This is thus also a young plant with both a good and bad bud on the same stem. The open bud turned out to be a flower with several rotten petals and stamens in it, we’ll see if it is a returning issue. I don’t know what other factors could be causing this? Humidity? Soil? Soil probably not I’d think or the problem would be present each year and probably on every flower.

      I’ve not noticed any difference between single, semi-double, or double cultivars. Some cultivars seem more susceptible than others. I should probably take notes what cultivars have most issues with it. And maybe ‘rose-buds’ are another issue, separate from ‘open buds’, the latter primarily being the fact that the outer petals are shorter than they ought to be.

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
    • #18969
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      The flowers tend to hold quite well. Five days later now and the flowers still look good. Here’s a close-up of a flower that was open back then. It has paled of course but there’s still some pink blush on the sides and I think it’s still very attractive.

      Td-later

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
    • #25537
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      Theresa,

      would be very welcome, see the private message I’ve sent you

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
    • #20458
      The Peony Society
      webmaster
      @the-peony-society
      Topics: 29
      Replies: 9

      Those are truly nice flowers. Don’t know about the bush habit and other characteristics, but would you expect the flowers to change a lot when the plants are more mature? From single to double, sure, but these are (airy) doubles and I guess the colour will not change as well. I really do like that flower form. There are several ‘cactus-dahlia’ style peonies around, but I personally don’t like those and I’m sure most people will find them unattractive because they simply look unfinished (and usually not very symmetrical). These ruffled ones that you show here will appeal to far more people. It’s nice to see some really ‘different’ peonies coming along in the future. I’ll admit to being a bit jealous (I don’t have anything like it), but I’ll have to congratulate you nonetheless 🙂

       

      Webmaster of The Peony Society

      0
Viewing 6 reply threads

or

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

or

Create Account