#21847
 The Peony Society 
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Lest we forget, here are some pictures I’ve taken from the roots now that they have been dug. The first picture shows both the comparison between a plant that has been mowed down after flowering (right) and one that was left to grow (left). The one mowed down still had green foliage and stems of course. Then the next three images, the first one is from the ‘normal’ Canary Brilliants, and the remaining two from the rebloomer. I couldn’t see any difference between the number of eyes (buds), the only real difference is that the ones on the mowed down one are much smaller. That would seem obvious as many of the secondary buds from the Spring growing season were ‘activated’ into growing during Summer and even some new buds on the Spring flowering stems (you can see that if you look good at the images (click them to enlarge)). New buds were developed amongst those new stems, but they didn’t have as much time to develop into large buds as yet. Still, they are there and I’m sure they will grow fine.

I should add that the rebloomers had many stems without flowers. Thus the average 5 flowers per plant in the article means that I did have some 5 flowering stems and perhaps another 7 not flowering, thus say some 12 stems in total. The remark that during a normal season (without those unusually hot days we experienced this year) more flowers would be attainable is based upon the fact that several of the not flowering stems showed a dried up bud and I attribute that to the extremely fast growing. It is well known from research (in Israel) that very high temperatures during growth can result in some aborted flower buds. Of course, some stems without a flower is not too bad as you need stems with foliage on to have new buds developing. Alternatively it would be wise, when cutting during Summer, to leave part of the stem with foliage on, something which is not too difficult as Canary Brilliants has tall stems that at times reach 120 cm (4 feet).

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