This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Luriel 4 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #25200
     khurtekant 
    Moderator
    @khurtekant
    Topics: 33
    Replies: 23

    Hello all,

    I got an e-mail conversation with someone who thought it a good idea to hybridize for very late flowering peony varieties. “That’s a good idea,” is what I’m thinking here. My own hybridizing goals are within the early flowering ones, partly because that’s when I still have time to make some controlled crosses. Now it would be nice to extend the flowering season at the other extreme as well. But I must say that I don’t really know any very very late flowering varieties that are both good and fertile.

    The few ones that come to mind are the following:

    Old Faithful: probably one of the last hybrids to flower. Many good qualities, but it won’t extend the flowering season of course, it still flowers just ahead of Sarah Bernhardt.

    Rozella: very late and very good, but don’t know if it is fertile.

    The Fawn: also late and very good, has usable pollen and I’ve sown some open pollinated seeds from it in the past, although the resulting mature seedlings are not particularly improvements to put it mildly.

    The truly late flowering ones here are infertile as far as I know: Elsa Sass, Ann Cousins.

    So, does anyone have some experience with peony hybridizing for late flowering varieties? Or does anyone have suggestions for good fertile late flowering ones?

     

    Growing peonies for cutflowers in Belgium. Also hybridizing them.

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  • #25201
     Ferdzy 
    Participant
    @ferdzy
    Topics: 0
    Replies: 1

    Michael Denny’s peony bloom date chart lists Dr. John L. Crenshaw as blooming 39 days after Red Charm.  It’s got to be a very obscure and hard peony to find, though. Elsa Sass is listed as only 15 days later than Red Charm, and Ann Cousins only 17 days later.

    I am growing Lord Cavin (19 days) and Candy Stripe (20 days). They are new in my garden and I know nothing about the fertility of Lord Cavin, but Candy Stripe is recorded as the seed parent of at least one hybrid.  Jappensha Ikku is one of my later blooming peonies and has produced seed, and I’m pretty sure it has also pollinated other peonies. It is listed as a “mid season” bloomer but not in my experience.  It isn’t on the list. The list is not all that up to date, nor could possibly have every peony. Still, I would recommend checking the list for potential varieties.

    http://peonybloomdate.com/data.htm

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  • #25216
     Hannah 
    Participant
    @hannah-hansen
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 6

    Thank you for starting this thread and for the great information about varieties, and the peony bloom date chart! I didn´t see this until now, so I already wrote a similar question in the hybridizers group. Sorry for that 🙂

    Hannah

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  • #25219
     Hannah 
    Participant
    @hannah-hansen
    Topics: 1
    Replies: 6

    Took a look at the blooming chart and these seem to be the latest according to that chart:

    John L. Crenshaw  (39 days)

    Golden Dawn (36 days)

    Charles McKellip (32 days)

    Red Satin (25 days)

    Polly Sharp (25)

    Fantastic (25)

    Avalon (25) (fertile)

    The problem is that  I  can´t find any of them, except for Red Satin, in Europe. I found seeds from Polly Sharp on the seed list from the American Peony Society though. I´m not a member unfortunately so I can´t search their member area for entries about these varieties. 🙁

     

     

    Hannah

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    • #25230
       Luriel 
      Participant
      @goldenqueen
      Topics: 1
      Replies: 15

      Hi Hannah
      I am a member of the Peony society..if you are interested i can share the seed list that comes from this years growing – But.. you will have to know.. many of this seedlings is open pollinated..

      so the seeds is : Of this mother peony ( name ) – and the father is often open pollinated ( pollen )
      This means that it is NOT the same peony .. as the mother ( named )

      That why.. we have to call it – From..and the name..
      As each peony has ( now a day huge amount of dna inside, as it is crossed many times to get their final amount ) – when this ( huge amount ) is crossed with a father ( pollen ) peony – also with ( huge amount ) dna – the resoult is not at all the same. – and even if it has self pollinated, the resoult will be different as new places of dna taking place by weather – season – health – maturement.

      BUT – anyway – if you will like to buy some seeds from the society you can join my list, if your interested.

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